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Author Topic: Rookie has problem with rear tire sliding in slow turns  (Read 1943 times)
Nozzu
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« on: May 24, 2020, 10:52:23 PM »

I know, that rear tire sliding can be caused by tire pressure, tire profile and wornout level, suspension and probably by seven other aspects.
But if it is. like in my case, only in really slow, 90 degree curves - for example, when im turning from one city street to other, i suspect its connected with how i try to control the bike. More specifically with throttle and clutch control.
n highway i do not use clutch on curves, just holding throttle. But in tight turns in city i have habit to squeeze the clutch, then turn and in the middle of turn i let clutch go. Not sudden BAM go but still.....can it be, that this may cause the sliding cause force delivered to rear tire and....

The Monster i ride is 750 
  
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stopintime
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« Reply #1 on: May 25, 2020, 12:31:43 AM »

How old is the tire?

What pressure is in it now?


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Nozzu
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« Reply #2 on: May 25, 2020, 01:23:19 AM »

Tire is one year old, Maxxis. That i have been using like around 1000 miles maybe (didnt have time to ride much last season, trying to fix that this year).
Pressure...dont know right now, but i try to keep it 3.2 Bar, like it should. Sometimes yea, it might be little less, but not tragically. 
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stopintime
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« Reply #3 on: May 25, 2020, 01:31:53 AM »

3.2 is way high  Shocked

That's very likely the reason. 2.4 is ok.

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Nozzu
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« Reply #4 on: May 25, 2020, 02:02:50 AM »

OMG.....sorry...im an idiot. I actually ment or use 2.1 in front and 2.2 rear.

Where did i get that 3.2...pff


Sorry about inadequate information. 
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ducpainter
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« Reply #5 on: May 25, 2020, 03:57:31 AM »

2.2 is fine.

IMO, your sliding is caused by using the clutch mid turn, and too much throttle.

Try doing all your clutching before you turn in, and use the throttle smoothly to power through the turn.
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Duck-Stew
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« Reply #6 on: May 25, 2020, 06:43:11 AM »

2.2 is fine.

IMO, your sliding is caused by using the clutch mid turn, and too much throttle.

Try doing all your clutching before you turn in, and use the throttle smoothly to power through the turn.

+1.
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stopintime
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« Reply #7 on: May 25, 2020, 08:15:47 AM »

Sprockets, chain, wheel bearings, steering bearings and wheel axle checked recently?

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Charlie98
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« Reply #8 on: May 27, 2020, 05:13:03 PM »

2.2 is fine.

IMO, your sliding is caused by using the clutch mid turn, and too much throttle.

Try doing all your clutching before you turn in, and use the throttle smoothly to power through the turn.

That... ^^^ but not necessarily because of too much throttle, tire slide can be caused by trailing throttle as well when you let the clutch out.  Unless your engine RPM exactly matches the speed of your wheel, you are either slowing down or speeding up that wheel while leaned over in a turn.  Best advise is to have all your braking and gear changing done before initiating the turn, and throttling through the turn.

When I bought my 796 I had issues with getting the right gear for some turns... usually slower, in-town turns... because the factory gearing was too high.  When I replaced the chain last year, I also changed the rear sprocket to a larger one, this allowed me to enter slower turns (like 90^ turns in the city) at a reasonable speed in a better gear where I wasn't lugging the engine.  If you do a lot of city driving, or the turns continue to be an issue, you might consider regearing your bike when it's time to replace the chain.
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